Talker’s Graduation (Talker #3)


Title: Talker’s Graduation (Talker #3)
Author: Amy Lane
Cover Art: Reese Dante
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
Buy Link: Amazon.com
Genre: Contemporary M/M Romance
Length: 66 pages
Rating: 4.5 out of 5 rating stars

A Guest Review by Raine

Summary Review: After the storms, rainbow’s end for Brian and Talker.

Blurb: Book Three of the Talker series — Sequel to Talker’s Redemption

When you get past the basics of survival, what next? Brian Cooper recovered from the attack that almost killed him, and Tate Walker faced down his own demons. Now all that’s left is… each other. Growing up together and growing into their love is everything but easy.

Talker’s eternal optimism and Brian’s quiet faith just might be able to conquer the obstacles, big and small, in their way—as well as overcome the complications of having all their dreams come true.

Review:

Readers who haven’t bravely suffered….. I mean enjoyed…… the previous two books, Talker and Talker’s Redemption, reviewed by Wave here and here…….. should not try this one first. This is recompense for those of us who have shared the guys’ truly painful lives up till now. The earlier books were a display of incredible hurt but also intimate redemptive love. For me, Talker’s Graduation felt like a celebratory epilogue—being only two thirds the length of the previous novellas. The story is roughly split between “Looking to the Past” and “Living in the Present”.

Talker and Brian’s lives are so intertwined they practically breathe in unison. This closeness is beautifully developed here, when Talker helps Brian find an easier way to cope with his post injury exercises. This simple caring action sets off long reaching consequences that benefit them both. I really enjoyed all the details of Brian’s new career. Talker’s opinions of Mark, Brian’s boss, and his later eavesdropping was all good stuff, adding a touch of tension to a predominantly contented tone. Brian’s first show and his empathic sculpture is the highlight of the book for me. Their simple pleasure in the new home and location is also a rich reward for the reader, though the casual acquisition of their complicated livestock could have had more detail.

There is a looser feel both to the writing and content in this third book. Using a knitting metaphor—because I’m learning to knit and it’s on my mind—I did feel that the holes between the yarn were getting larger. While this was a good character insight,

But Talker knew the truth — he probably could reach the sky — but first he’d have to decide which end was up.

I felt that his eventual new interests could have been explored further with more page time.

However I thought the title’s subtle irony was delightfully reinforced by the developments in Talker’s life. Given all he has gone through, it felt particularly sweet that it is the real growth in emotional confidence which represents his personal graduation.

Recommended to all Talker and Brian supporters.

Talker Series

12 comments

  • “”This is recompense for those of us who have shared the guys’ truly painful lives up till now. “” —So True.
    I truly enjoyed this story. I thought it finished their story on a great note.

    Reply
    • Hi hannah,

      yes I so agree about this ending, now when I think of Talker and Brian of being happy together it’s good to have some really lovely stuff to add to the picture, rather than my usual general feeling that- well they’ll be looking after each other!

      Happy Halloween. 🙂

      Reply
  • well worth it! :0) is it a total 5 star-er for me? nope. i was wondering at your reasons for the gaps. it was, however, a great transition from adolescence to adulthood for me…
    :0)
    -kkm

    Reply
    • I loved that they still had that pure adolescent intensity of emotion, kkm, something I feel Amy Lane writes very well. I’m glad we both enjoyed it. 🙂

      Reply
  • Hmmmm, nice review Raine, funny I actually was sure I am skipping this one, because angst in the first one did me in, but you are saying this one has a happy vibe? I may just get it after all lol.

    Reply
  • That’s funny– I really DID think of this as a reward to the boys for all of the pain they endured, and, I guess, for the readers too. I was hoping for an “Into the sunset” feel–I’m so glad it seems as though I succeeded! Thank you so much for the review, Raine–and I’m honored to have been a recipient of one of your few fives–and also of this review right here:-) 🙂 😎

    Reply
    • Thank you Amy

      Talker and Brian are two of my favourite characters and it has felt like I’ve seen them grow up and finally flourish under the most awful conditions. We all deserved your happy ending. :flowers:

      Reply
  • I agree with you, Raine. This one did feel like a reward. IMO, it is not as strong a story as the first two, but still very worth reading. I enjoyed it, and will read all three again. Thanks for the review.

    Reply
    • I am always somehow surprised that the first 2 books are on my reread list. 😕

      Like you I’m looking forward to reading the three in succession.

      Thanks kiracee.

      Reply
  • Hey kkm

    I loved the happy, holistic vibe this story had. It just fell a little short for me. I felt Talker’s work with the children – a huge thing for him- was underdeveloped, what we had was lovely and intimate, but I really felt more content was needed to emphasize the importance of it all.

    Another little thing was the animals, going from keeping rats to looking after livestock is huge, I’d have liked some real practical sense of that. The beasties clearly mattered to Talker and Brian. Amy Lane’s descriptions of Deacon working with horses in the Promises series is accurate and very well done with a light touch.

    I have only given two 5 star awards ( 1 of those to Clear Water ! )
    from 50 reviews, so I guess you could call me mean. 🙁

    I also guess this was 5 star book for you. 😀 Hope this clarifies how I felt.

    Reply
  • concise review about such a lovely story – but why only a 4.5? what was missing for you other than pages?
    -kkm

    Reply

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