Breathing Lessons: A Novel


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Title: Breathing Lessons: A Novel
Author: Andy Sinclair
Publisher: Véhicule Press
Release Date: July, 2015
Genre(s): Gay Fiction
Page Count: 108
Reviewed by: LenaRibka
Heat Level: 3 flames out of 5
Rating: 5 stars out of 5
Blurb:

A bold and explicit debut novel by one of the most visceral new voices in gay fiction, Breathing Lessons is the story of Henry Moss, a homosexual everyman whose life knows none of the limitations or abuses his predecessors experienced. When a teenaged Henry came out to his mother, she worried only that he’d be lonely. At the time, he thought her concerns were old-fashioned. Two decades later, he’s had supportive family and friends, he’s well-liked by the athletes who train with him, trusted in his professional life, parties whenever he pleases, and performs all manner of sexual acts with whomever he wants. But as he gets older and, increasingly, the men he sleeps with are married, Henry finds that his mother may have been right. Can he find the lasting intimacy he craves in his life amidst the equal-opportunity freedom afforded by his generation’s openness? Learning to navigate between the two is as delicate as learning to breathe again.


I’m going through my 28th Lambda Award Nominees reading right now.
Breathing Lessons is a finalist in the category Gay Fiction.
And you know what?
I’ve just finished it, and I don’t want to read other books in this category. I have already my winner.

THIS book could be a nominee in many categories – Best Debut or Gay Erotica or Gay Memoir.
That is exactly that makes this novel so special – a refreshing mix of many genres written in an unique way.

Breathing Lessons is the story of Henry Moss, a NORMAL gay guy, who, since he came out in his teenage years, enjoys his freedom, occasional erotic encounters, the futile lightness of being. All his relationships are either a one night stand or hopeless affairs with married or straight guys, nice connections, nothing more. Parties, joints, a snorted line, and hormones rule his life. He is still catching up, he is still gaining sexual experience, he is still inventing his sexuality, he is still…searching for…LOVE? But is it really what he WANTS? Is it HOW he imagined his life would be? HOW many ugly frogs one has to kiss to find his/her prince? HOW many painful mistakes does a person have to make to learn from?

Don’t we all just want to be happy and have someone to take care of us and to be loved and to love back?
We don’t have to learn it, it is inside us. Like breathing. But sometimes we need to learn to breath again.

This book is sarcastic, philosophical, honest, creative and simply good.

I always admire the creativity of an author in regard to the chapter names.
It could tell you more than thousands words in a long-length review.
Judge for yourself.

Contents:

LESSON ONE
How to Play the Victim

LESSON TWO
Live Life to the Fullest

LESSON THREE
Everything Floats at Different Levels

LESSON FOUR
We’re Just Like Everybody Else!

LESSON FIVE
People who Sense Sadness Stay Away

LESSON SIX
You Are Not Going to Love Everybody

LESSON SEVEN
She Doesn’t Want You to Have a Hard Life

LESSON EIGHT
Treat Yourself to the Very Occasional Cigarette

LESSON NINE
Choose a Dare Over a Truth

LESSON TEN
No Means Yes

LESSON ELEVEN
You Don’t Have to Believe in God, Just Hope

LESSON TWELVE
Open Your Heart, If You Have One

LESSON THIRTEEN
Any Shoulder Will Do

LESSON FOURTEEN
Some People Are Not Happy Unless

LESSON FIFTEEN
Everybody Gets Man Love Sometimes

LESSON SIXTEEN
Being With You Makes Me Feel So Bad

LESSON SEVENTEEN
Sorry Isn’t Good Enough

LESSON EIGHTEEN
Tell Them What You Need

LESSON NINETEEN
People Should Do What They Want

LESSON TWENTY
Anybody Who Shows Up Is Welcome


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Advanced Review Copy

Galley copy of Breathing Lessons: A Novel provided by Véhicule Press in exchange of an honest review.

Author

A passionate reader from Germany. I learned to read at the age of 4 and never stopped since then, though my books from that time were very different from what they are now. English is my third language, and I’m sorry for all grammar mistakes I made in my reviews. But I assure you, that my reading English is much better than my writing English. I’m a seeker for the books that differ from mainstream, that provoke the reader or have very often very opposite ratings.

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